T H E B U I L D I N G

The building that houses Church & State was built in 1925. Designed by St. Louis-based architect E.J. Eckel, the seven-story structure quickly became a sensation for its astronomical cost -- upwards of two million dollars, a princely sum at the time -- and its Beaux Arts refinement, which was unusual for a factory of its size. It was also notable for its patron: the National Biscuit Company, later renamed Nabisco, who moved into the space and immediately began pumping out biscuits and sugar wafers (out of two separate production lines). The section of the building that houses Church & State was the factory’s loading dock.

Nabisco sold the building in the 1960s. Decades of neglect followed, until the building was acquired in the early 2000s by development firm Linear City, who proposed a conversion into live-work lofts spaces.  Because of its status as a Historic-Cultural Monument, the process was slow and laborious. Eventually, in 2007, Linear City completed its work and opened the building to tenants. It won several awards in the subsequent year for its respectful and earnest reworking of the historic space.